The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14 file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14 book. Happy reading The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14 Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14 at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14 Pocket Guide.

We are also directly affected by events that occur far away. We feel a sense of sadness when children are starving in Eastern Africa. Similarly, we feel a sense of joy when a family is reunited after decades of separation by the Berlin Wall. Our crops and livestock are contaminated and our health and livelihood threatened when a nuclear accident happens miles away in another country. Our own security is enhanced when peace breaks out between warring parties in other continents. But war or peace; the destruction or the protection of nature; the violation or promotion of human rights and democratic freedoms; poverty or material well-being; the lack of moral and spiritual values or their existence and development; and the breakdown or development of human understanding, are not isolated phenomena that can be analysed and tackled independently of one another.

In fact, they are very much interrelated at all levels and need to be approached with that understanding. Peace, in the sense of the absence of war, is of little value to someone who is dying of hunger or cold. It will not remove the pain of torture inflicted on a prisoner of conscience. It does not comfort those who have lost their loved ones in floods caused by senseless deforestation in a neighbouring country. Peace can only last where human rights are respected, where the people are fed, and where individuals and nations are free. True peace with oneself and with the world around us can only be achieved through the development of mental peace.

The other phenomena mentioned above are similarly interrelated. Thus, for example, we see that a clean environment, wealth or democracy mean little in the face of war, especially nuclear war, and that material development is not sufficient to ensure human happiness. Material progress is of course important for human advancement. In Tibet, we paid much too little attention to technological and economic development, and today we realise that this was a mistake. At the same time, material development without spiritual development can also cause serious problems, In some countries too much attention is paid to external things and very little importance is given to inner development.

I believe both are important and must be developed side by side so as to achieve a good balance between them. Tibetans are always described by foreign visitors as being a happy, jovial people.


  • United States Trade and Investment in Latin America: Opportunities for Business in the 1990s: Opportunities for Business in the 1990s.
  • Destination Bipolar?
  • DIABOLIK (125): Ginko in ostaggio (Italian Edition).
  • rudolf steiner (E-kitapları)!
  • The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14;
  • The Bella Coola 4:Dogs in the Forest (Dogs Around the Dragon Book 3).
  • Lecture 14.

This is part of our national character, formed by cultural and religious values that stress the importance of mental peace through the generation of love and kindness to all other living sentient beings, both human and animal. Inner peace is the key: if you have inner peace, the external problems do not affect your deep sense of peace and tranquility.

In that state of mind you can deal with situations with calmness and reason, while keeping your inner happiness. That is very important. Without this inner peace, no matter how comfortable your life is materially, you may still be worried, disturbed or unhappy because of circumstances.

The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 4 of 14 - Rudolf Steiner - Google книги

Clearly, it is of great importance, therefore, to understand the interrelationship among these and other phenomena, and to approach and attempt to solve problems in a balanced way that takes these different aspects into consideration. Of course it is not easy. But it is of little benefit to try to solve one problem if doing so creates an equally serious new one.

Related Events

So really we have no alternative: we must develop a sense of universal responsibility not only in the geographic sense, but also in respect to the different issues that confront our planet. Responsibility does not only lie with the leaders of our countries or with those who have been appointed or elected to do a particular job.

It lies with each one of us individually. Peace, for example, starts with each one of us. When we have inner peace, we can be at peace with those around us. When our community is in a state of peace, it can share that peace with neighbouring communities, and so on. When we feel love and kindness towards others, it not only makes others feel loved and cared for, but it helps us also to develop inner happiness and peace.


  1. Rick 2: Acht Pfeifen an Bord und kein Land in Sicht (German Edition)?
  2. Read PDF The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 3 of 14!
  3. Nobel Lecture.
  4. Chapter 8 an introduction to metabolism homework answers.
  5. Feminism and Socialism in China (Routledge Revivals).
  6. Read PDF The Foundations of Human Experience: Lecture 14 of 14;
  7. And there are ways in which we can consciously work to develop feelings of love and kindness. For some of us, the most effective way to do so is through religious practice. For others it may be non-religious practices. What is important is that we each make a sincere effort to take our responsibility for each other and for the natural environment we live in seriously. I am very encouraged by the developments which are taking place around us. The report to the United Nations Secretary-General by the World Commission on the Environment and Development the Brundtland Report was an important step in educating governments on the urgency of the issue.

    Serious efforts to bring peace to war-torn zones and to implement the right to self-determination of some people have resulted in the withdrawal of Soviet troops from Afghanistan and the establishment of independent Namibia. Through persistent nonviolent popular efforts dramatic changes, bringing many countries closer to real democracy, have occurred in many places, from Manila in the Philippines to Berlin in East Germany.

    Top Authors

    With the Cold War era apparently drawing to a close, people everywhere live with renewed hope. Sadly, the courageous efforts of the Chinese people to bring similar change to their country was brutally crushed last June. But their efforts too are a source of hope.

    The military might has not extinguished the desire for freedom and the determination of the Chinese people to achieve it. What these positive changes indicate, is that reason, courage, determination, and the inextinguishable desire for freedom can ultimately win. In the struggle between forces of war, violence and oppression on the one hand, and peace, reason and freedom on the other, the latter are gaining the upper hand.

    This realisation fills us Tibetans with hope that some day we too will once again be free. The awarding of the Nobel Prize to me, a simple monk from faraway Tibet, here in Norway, also fills us Tibetans with hope. It means, despite the fact that we have not drawn attention to our plight by means of violence, we have not been forgotten. It also means that the values we cherish, in particular our respect for all forms of life and the belief in the power of truth, are today recognised and encouraged. It is also a tribute to my mentor, Mahatma Gandhi, whose example is an inspiration to so many of us.

    I am deeply touched by the sincere concern shown by so many people in this part of the world for the suffering of the people of Tibet. That is a source of hope not only for us Tibetans, but for all oppressed people. As you know, Tibet has, for forty years, been under foreign occupation.

    Today, more than a quarter of a million Chinese troops are stationed in Tibet. Some sources estimate the occupation army to be twice this strength. During this time, Tibetans have been deprived of their most basic human rights, including the right to life, movement, speech, worship, only to mention a few. Almost everything that remained was destroyed during the Cultural Revolution. I do not wish to dwell on this point, which is well documented.

    THE ANNENBERG FOUNDATION

    What is important to realise, however, is that despite the limited freedom granted after , to rebuild parts of some monasteries and other such tokens of liberalisation, the fundamental human rights of the Tibetan people are still today being systematically violated. In recent months this bad situation has become even worse. If it were not for our community in exile, so generously sheltered and supported by the government and people of India and helped by organisations and individuals from many parts of the world, our nation would today be little more than a shattered remnant of a people.

    Our culture, religion and national identity would have been effectively eliminated. As it is, we have built schools and monasteries in exile and have created democratic institutions to serve our people and preserve the seeds of our civilisation. With this experience, we intend to implement full democracy in a future free Tibet.

    3. Foundations: Freud

    Thus, as we develop our community in exile on modern lines, we also cherish and preserve our own identity and culture and bring hope to millions of our countrymen and -women in Tibet. The issue of most urgent concern at this time, is the massive influx of Chinese settlers into Tibet. Tibetans are rapidly being reduced to an insignificant minority in their own country. This development, which threatens the very survival of the Tibetan nation, its culture and spiritual heritage, can still be stopped and reversed.

    But this must be done now, before it is too late. The new cycle of protest and violent repression, which started in Tibet in September of and culminated in the imposition of martial law in the capital, Lhasa, in March of this year, was in large part a reaction to this tremendous Chinese influx. Information reaching us in exile indicates that the protest marches and other peaceful forms of protest are continuing in Lhasa and a number of other places in Tibet, despite the severe punishment and inhumane treatment given to Tibetans detained for expressing their grievances.

    Event description. Description With an immensely rich and complex history spanning several millennia, India offers an overwhelming palette of visual options. Read more Read less. Map and Directions View Map. Save This Event Log in or sign up for Eventbrite to save events you're interested in. Sign Up. Already have an account? Log in. Event Saved. Your message has been sent! Your email will only be seen by the event organizer. Your Name. Email Address. Enter the code as shown below:.

    Send message Please wait Copy Event URL.